Cover Story

  May 2022

Fairhaven Needs an Updated Village Plan

by Barbara Clarke Seven years ago, my daughter and I moved to Bellingham and settled on the outskirts of Fairhaven. Some of the persuasive features were an affordable apartment, the beautifully maintained trails, Fairhaven Park nearby, the exciting daylighting of … Continue reading

Comments Off on Fairhaven Needs an Updated Village Plan

  May 2022

The Quality of Our Drinking Water Continues to Decline

Editor’s Note: The Lake Whatcom Monitoring Project was initiated in the 1980s to measure and track long-term lake data for temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, turbidity, and nutrients, including nitrogen and phosphorus. The work is performed by WWU’s Institute for … Continue reading

Comments Off on The Quality of Our Drinking Water Continues to Decline

  April 2022

Salish Sea Facing Relentless Pressure

Editor’s Note: The following is an executive summary of the State of the Salish Sea, which was produced by the Salish Sea Institute at Western Washington University. The full report, released at the end of May 2021, details the work … Continue reading

Comments Off on Salish Sea Facing Relentless Pressure

  March 2022

Preserving a Sacred Trust

by Ken Brusic Gabe Epperson has two offices: a vast landscape that stretches eastward from the shores of the Salish Sea to the foothills of the Cascades, and a small room in a downtown Bellingham office along the banks of … Continue reading

Comments Off on Preserving a Sacred Trust

  March 2022

Trouble in the Nooksack River Watershed

by Mariama Dryak For those of you who read Whatcom Watch, you will know that the North Cascades Glacier Climate Project (NCGCP), which has been tracking glacier change over the past 38 years, has recorded a significant loss of glacier … Continue reading

Comments Off on Trouble in the Nooksack River Watershed

  February 2022

Good News: Tiny Forests Help Slow Climate Change

Editor’s Note: This article marks the beginning of a new column, “Beyond Fossil Fuels.”  by Vicki Thomas Climate change has become frighteningly real in the last year here in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been pummeled by alternating extremes of heat/drought/wildfire … Continue reading

Comments Off on Good News: Tiny Forests Help Slow Climate Change

  February 2022

Oregon Spotted Frog Needs Local Help

by Lorraine Wilde Endemic to the Pacific Northwest and historically distributed in the Puget Trough/Willamette Valley province and the Cascade Mountains of south-central Washington and Oregon, the Oregon spotted frog (OSF) has been lost from more than 78 percent of … Continue reading

Comments Off on Oregon Spotted Frog Needs Local Help

  January 2022

Glacial Losses During a Year of Extremes

Field notes from the North Cascades Glacier Climate Project  by Sally Vaux If you spent time in the Pacific Northwest this past summer, you probably noticed Mount Baker looked vastly different from its typical snow-capped state. Instead of a bright … Continue reading

Comments Off on Glacial Losses During a Year of Extremes

  January 2022

Alluvial Farms: Local Conservation Farming

by Lorraine Wilde and Aneka Sweeney It takes a village to build a farm and keep it viable long term. With 32 years of combined farming experience, Katie Pencke and Matthew McDermott founded Alluvial Farms in 2016. (1) “We spent … Continue reading

Comments Off on Alluvial Farms: Local Conservation Farming

  December 2021

Post Point Renovations

Editor’s Note: This  is an excerpt from an article about anaerobic digesters and the Post Point plant that appeared in the September 2020 issue of Whatcom Watch. by Giovanni Roverso Anaerobic digesters are projected to replace a pair of aging … Continue reading

Comments Off on Post Point Renovations